Entrepreneur Tip: Don’t Ask Permission. Ask Forgiveness.

Tue, Aug 16, 2011

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Larry Chiang scandalously reveals how stuff really works and breaks it down. He edits the Bloomberg BusinessWeek channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (its the same title as his NY Times bestseller). He is Entrepreneur in Residence at Stanford University. If you read his hilariously awesome “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

Entrepreneur Tip: Don’t Ask Permission. Ask Forgiveness.

By Larry Chiang

Asking for forgiveness (versus permission) is often a tip I have heard.

I hear them at keynotes and panels on entrepreneurship. The advice semi-motivates. The idea is to forge forward but there is RISK in having to ask for forgiveness. There is a risk of getting yelled at and embarrassed.

Well me and my controversial brand hardly gets yelled at. I break a lot of rules and didn’t have to ask for forgiveness or / and permission. This maneuver of Permission-Forgiveness is part of my Guacamole Recipe Series for Entrepreneurship. Guacamole is easy to make but hard to make in a legendary, award-winning fashion. I engineer guacamole recipes for entrepreneurs to beat the catch-22s of a startup.

Here are about 13 tactics broken down into 5 categories for how to “Don’t Ask Permission. Ask Forgiveness.”

-1- Align and Augment in a Value Added Way

I observe that there are 650 possible little details.

Designing a product launch in a new market?! 650 details.
Getting a new conference up?! 650 details
Investigating a murder as law enforcement?! Search 650 little details that the culprit needed to think through.

You are a genius and a hustler if you can think up of 400-425.

The saying, “There is always more you could do” is true because even a legendary and awesome thing only covers 425. There are still over 200 possible other things. This is your opportunity to not ask for permission to execute.

Align and augment by doing 30-35 of the over 200 possible other things for the entity that at best will execute 425 things.

For example, the GSB hosts an annual entrepreneurship mixer during Stanford Entrepreneur Week. It is really, really big and really really bad. After the two bad years, I decided to augment their event in a value added way by inviting 13 VCs. I called it the “Reverse VC Pitch (Sub) Party at GSB”. I asked for VCs to ‘sponsor’ and brought balloons to tie to the VCs wrists. I thought I’d add value by promoting the event to my VC friends to help them connect. I did not keep the PR and goodwill for myself but rather for a startup I was a fan of: Plancast — It was their first live event. I definitely did not ask for permission to hijack the GSB entrepreneurship mixer but provided added value for the party attendees and the VCs I roped into pitching and quasi-sponsoring (I did a rebate model where if the VC showed up, they got their money back).

What are the ’650 things’ leads to the next point…

-2- Guestimate Agenda

I love the technique of brainstorming “Multiple Party Agenda Fulfillment”. The old way was win-win. In academia and b-school it works. In the real world, there are multiple parties that all need to win. Engineering a win-win-win-win-win-win-win-win-win is possible when you start guestimating multiple parties and their multiple agendas.

For example, there was a new franchise in the making when the TechCrunch summer party was first at August Capital. I looked at their event and guessed that they were not going to have enough resources to produce a separate afterparty at a different venue. I also guessed that they might have sponsors that were wanting to get distribution for their message. Those people could sponsor and they would pay it directly to TechCrunch. The mulitple party agenda fulfillment component comes from brainstorming the potential parties involved and their agenda expanded HERE

-3- Prepare Countermeasures

You are going to be stepping on toes. Prepare countermeasures to those knee-jerk reactions.

There is a quote from TrueVentures conference.

‘Out of the 12,000 people there, only 200 people do all the coding and create the product. All the others are there to tell you why you can’t do what you want to do. None of those guys work for us.’”—Amit Kumar, Vurve.com

The bad news from the above example is that there are 11,800 wanting to pee on your parade. The good news is that most knee-jerk urination is not well thought through… Here are bullet points on specific reactions and the countermeasures required…

Pee Countermeasure
Terse Email – Open dialog. Be ok with communicating your 30-35 of 650 possible

Voicemail threat – Open dialog. Ask to be fired but not quite yet

General threat – Open dialog. Do above and give veto power

Meeting request – Open dialog. Meet on neutral ground and preview your full plan. Give credit and simiultaneously allow for plausible deniability

Legal threat – Open dialog. Remember a cease and desist is an opening negotiating position. They probably will love you when they realize you’re doing 30-35 things to augment their existing parade. The good news is that you’re gonna star in their next board meeting so you better start charming, preparing, countermeasuring, gathering up relationship capital and charming. I said charming 2x because its important.

Back channel threat – Open dialog but not too much. It’ll be along the lines of “As your friend, I am telling you…” Educate the back-channel communicator that you’re executing 30-35 things in a value added hijacking fashion. And that you’re open to feedback. And thank them for the back-channel communication

Preparing countermeasures goes a long way. You ask for forgiveness from a position of strength. Your hijack has momentum because you didn’t ask for permission. Here is how to get more momentum before you have to execute countermesures.

-4- Get Momentum Before You Ask Forgiveness and After Not Asking Permission

Not asking for permission allows you to do what others find so difficult: Execution.
Not asking for permission is best done if you know and understand the environment.
Not asking for permission gets you ahead with documented work that they can take credit for later. Be the point person in that effort.

My execution mentor, Jim Rohn, has my favorite quote… “No wonder they were successful… look at all they DID”

There is another quote: “The harder I work, the luckier I get”.

I recommend executing on the 30-35 so that you brainstormed. You and your startup are a snowball rolling down the hill. You are getting bigger and bigger. But make sure your getting big is stable versus leveraged. Stay balanced in your large-ness by…

-5- Transferring Power to the Host Organization.

In open field interrogation, I transfer power to people to see who they are. Open field interrogation is the opposite of waterboarding or closed room interrogation. Open field interrogation allows you to see what that organization does with power.

I seek to transfer power back to the host organization as a pre-emptive measure before I am forced to ask for forgiveness. An ounce of prevention may be worth of pound of cure, but an ounce of pre-emptive power transfer is worth a ton of relationship capital that can be used for getting forgiveness. Here is exactly how to pre-emptively transfer power.

Subject line forecasts, updates and previews — You are seeking to be transparent and open in your value added hijack

Ask to be fired — The best employee is one that you can steal the credit but also blame them if things go wrong. You will be this ‘best “employee”‘. You will be even better because you are temporary and they get the power because you “Asked to be fired (eventually)”

Give veto power — Presidents can shut down a bill. You give them veto power to cancel whatever you are working on.

Give power to line item veto — Dictators can line-item veto. A line-item veto allows them to have the ability to cancel the smallest of little things

Entrepreneurs — go out and gain a lot but not have to risk anything using these tips for “Don’t Ask Permission. Ask Forgiveness.” If there is a maneuver you want de-mystified, email me and I will concoct a guacamole recipe for you.

Entrepreneurship, promotion, launching a franchise, investigating murder all require execution of 650 little details.

Execution for both large and small organizations can take time. In not asking for permission, I start executing little details.

If you liked this…
default
Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983.
His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

*** BONUS ***
a party invite for you…

This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”.
Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog .


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Perpetual Promotion Machine: Larry Chiang

Mon, Aug 15, 2011

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Larry Chiang teaches at a school that he could not get into and wrote a sequel to a book he read and re-read one time too many. He edits the Bloomberg BusinessWeek channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. After speaking at a school in the Boston area, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). He launched his book at a fashion show in NY called Mercedes Benz Fashion Week and wrote, “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA”. If you liked “9 VCs You’re Gonna Want to Avoid” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

Perpetual Promotion Machine: Larry Chiang

By Remmy Oxley
(Unedited by Larry Chiang)

There is a perpetual promotional force of nature here in Silicon Valley. His name is Larry Chiang.

Goodness, he is really, really good at promotion. The guy sits on dizzying number of board seats (12 I know of) and is not a VC nor an angel investor. In the same way that cold fusion and perpetual motion using magnets are the promise of free energy, so is Larry Chiang’s use of events, social media and conferences to build momentum on itself. I basically said conferences twice because I can’t go to one where he isn’t speaking, hosting or promoting something.

He even tweeted:

All of his stuff promotes his other stuff.

This guy makes David Geffen look like a non- Operator.

Well, I learned something that is truly horrifying. He is an Entrepreneur in Residence at Stanford University. Extremely effen prestigious… From my research, the first.

And he even has a movie deal brewing: ProsperAss based on his 386 page book with 280 pictures which I will not name. I heard from a trusted friend that he met to ink a deal and that Scooter Braun may be co-producing. Re-cock-ulous. The twitter account has followers already. The kid even blogged movie quotes from a movie that isn’t made yet. He even convinced a large Christian organization to promote / produce it. THE MOVIE IS ABOUT STRIPPERS.

What effen gives.

Stanford EIR?! Movie deal?!

But did Stanford even check his academic references?! A simple call to 217-333-1000 could confirm whether or not he got a diploma. Forget about engineering… did he even get a degree in ANYTHING?!

He is extremely charming. I will give him that.

I will even say he is over-the-top awkwardly good looking. No, I am not in the gay mafia. The Ford Modelling agency did confirm he is on the active roster. He is also schedule to appear at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week. Hours of research and all I could confirm was that he is good looking and charming.

Someone call the registrar’s office at the University of Illinois in Urbana / Champaign: 217-333-1000.

In the same way that he claims he worked at a Chemical Sales Engineer and that he graduated with the highest starting compensation of $170k…, there is zero record of his ever having been enrolled in a chemistry class. He claims Steven Zumdahl is a mentor. Chiang even cited and sourced Zumdahl in his books and blog posts. Zumdahl is the author of “Chemistry”. It is one of the most used Chem textbooks on the planet. I bet Chiang just bought the book off of Amazon. And then I bet Chiang started emailing Steven Zumdahl versus really being in his class.

Here is another whopper. Duck9 with all of its users and real sales is not even a registered corporation. Vapor Incorporated.

Its like he just appeared. Made up a bunch of stuff out of nothing. Made up a family that all went Ivy. Made a bunch of money in credit*. Charmed a senator that became president**. Charmed college students***. Charmed entrepreneurs and mentored using “Guacamole” recipes??. Video. Built a legendary brand for himself with charm and a boatload of moxie.

These questions linger:
- How did he insert himself into the PayPal mafia so thoroughly?
- How does he know the editor of this blog, Tony Perkins so well?
- Did he ever sell cars?
- How did he get all the random knowledge that he possess. See quora.
- What is his real agenda?

I just don’t get it.

I don’t blame you for falling for any of it cuz I did too.

I gave him money to the ReverseVC pitch party in Austin at SXSW. Sure, I did not get cheated and sure he is a great time and sure I got a personal uptik in brand by aligning with him… But I just feel so duped that he was never in engineering school.

Here is the kicker. I bet he is a snot nosed 27 year old kid just pretending to be a seasoned veteran and somehow assumed the identity of a credit executive. Or he sold his soul.

Here is the whopper. I bet when he reads this slap to his face– that he will actually like it. I bet he actually executes his own book’s Chapter 11 and propels himself forward. Its his chapter on ‘Failure’.

This video was taken guerilla style off the Villagio Resort deck. Its probably something he crashed.

If you liked this…
default
Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983.
His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

*** BONUS ***
a party invite for you…

This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”.
Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog .


Continue reading...

The Minimum Viable Blog Post

Mon, Aug 15, 2011

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Larry Chiang teaches at a school that he could not get into and wrote a sequel to a book he read and re-read one time too many. He edits the Bloomberg BusinessWeek channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. After speaking at a school in the Boston area, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). He launched his book at a fashion show in NY called Mercedes Benz Fashion Week and wrote, “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA”. If you liked “9 VCs You’re Gonna Want to Avoid” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

The Minimum Viable Blog Post

By Larry Chiang

The pillar of my effort to get distribution rests on MVBP. The Minimum Viable Blog Post.

Eric Ries has ‘Minimum Viable Product’. I have The Minimum Viable Blog Post. It is uses my 3, 2, 1 formula for blogging.

3 paragraphs, 2 pictures, 1 focus.
12 sentences total.

I argue that doing perfect work is tough.
I argue that having gotten it done and out into the wild is 100x better.

My book has a picture of the Stanford map with Sharpie writing.

An example MVBP is Kiran Divvala. I met him when I spoke at MIT Sloan.
http://kdivvela.posterous.com/3-paragraphs-12-sentences-2-pictures-1-focus

Another example is Jeff Lawrence. He was my student in ENGR145
http://larrychiangexperiment.wordpress.com/tag/jeff-lawrence-larry-chiang-experiment-granular-social-data-analytics-lab/

If you liked this…
default
Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983.
His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

*** BONUS ***
a party invite for you…

This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”.
Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog .


Continue reading...

Koret House Benefits If You Attend Best of the Bay Party

Wed, Jul 6, 2011

0 Comments

Larry Chiang writes about entrepreneurship and pre-entrepreneurship. He edits the Bloomberg BusinessWeek channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). If you read his scandalously awesome “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

Koret House Benefits If You Attend Best of the Bay Party


By Larry Chiang

This is a party I attend every year.

I put on my uniform (khaki pants, black shoes, and an oxford) and get there 5 minutes before the party starts. Instead of previewing the party, I thought I’d just explain it in 4000 words (aka four pictures because a picture is worth…)

ENJOY and see you Thursday.

Guess over or under. The time that these two have known each other is 45 minutes. Email me, larry @duck9 .com your guess

Secret disc Code for Best of the Bay expires Midnight TUES: AA4A/AA4AVIP

Live Music and tons of restaurants!

My fave party = Best of the Bay

Best of the Bay donation package with me, Larry Chiang, wrangling you at Fashion Week in NYC (Now known as Mercedes Benz Fashion Week)

If you liked this… default

Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983. His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School
*** BONUS ***

a party invite for you…


This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”. Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog


Continue reading...

What They Do Teach You at Brewmaster School

Wed, Jun 15, 2011

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Larry Chiang helps engineers graduate with street-smarts. What they don’t teach in b-school they now do teach in engineering schools and via the Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. He holds a JBA (Jedi in Business Administration). After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). If you read his scandalously awesome “How to Hack at AfterParty“, “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

What They Do Teach You at Brewmaster School


By Larry Chiang

“What They Do Teach You at Brewmaster School”

Palo Alto Calif — Meet the New Incubator

Business accelerators and incubators were prevalent during the last boom. Well, meet the newest one: Anheuser Busch Innovation Beer Garage.

No I did not just make that up.

They have a seasoned Silicon Valley executive: Winston Wang. His title is Global Director, Strategic Innovation Beer Garage.

I didn’t make that up either.

He is supported by JD Whittington who is a Wharton grad and flanked by Andrew Janssen who graduated engineering from University of Illinois. Both were in their first week in Palo Alto.

I asked specifically if beer was going to be brewed in this “garage”. Andrew and JD said that this office was set up to discover and support new startups. No beer will be home-brewed here and they weren’t looking to un-disrupt Gordon Biersch micro brewery (two doors down on Emerson)

They had a pre-launch reception FRIDAY from 5-8pm. It was chock full of founders from Dallas, Texas. Outside of me, there were zero Silicon Valley tech founders. But there was one VC from Sand Hill Road. One.

There were five or six incubatees of Tech Wildcatters headed up by Gabriella Draney who was in attendance. Each portfolio company brought 1-3 founders each. Read more about their past demo day here.

Tech Wildcatters buys 6% of your company for $25,000. Tech WildCatters has a stable of 40 mentors and one was even in attendance at the Anheuser Busch office at Emerson and Forest avenue.

It joins Y-Combinator, Founder Den, StartX (formerly SSE Labs).

If you liked this… default

Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983. His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

*** BONUS ***

a party invite for you…


This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”. Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog


Continue reading...

How to Make Good Choices from Ivory Towers

Sat, Jun 4, 2011

0 Comments

Larry Chiang helps engineers graduate with street-smarts. What they don’t teach in b-school they now do teach in engineering schools and via the Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. He holds a JBA (Jedi in Business Administration). After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). If you read his scandalously awesome “How to Hack at AfterParty“, “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

How to Make Good Choices from Ivory Towers


By Larry Chiang

I get to go to board meetings.

A lot of them border of the cliche of an Ivory Tower meeting.

Ivory Tower meetings imply
- disconnection with reality
- elitism to the n-the degree
- general pompousness of upper management dictating ludicrous commands to troops in the trenches

Ivory Towers are not exactly in tune with reality
Art credit: HideYoshi

Well, here is actually some insight as to how to actually make good choices from the tower of ivory:

-1- Location Aware

Selecting a meeting location at the Four Seasons Palo Alto when you’re discussing micro-loans to inner-city  is silly

At UCMS when we would do QBRs (quarterly business reviews) we would have them on a college campus versus a banks headquarters.

-2- Rotate in a Board Observer

The same people tend to make the same decisions.

Just like a TV show, rotating in a guest star spruces things up.

-3- Pay Some Commission

Cash as commission is tough.

Board members may be seasoned executives but they still like the same stuff that kids like.

Meetings go better with sugar so use cupcakes and cookies to incentivize

-4- Message from the Front Lines

Make board members think they know what the front lines are like is ok. Make them really visit the front or actually bring in front line battle weary soldiers is a big, big gamble.

-5- Customer Feedback

Nothing brings an ivory tower down faster than having it come into contact with real customers.

Nurture your boards’ fragile egos by not bringing in real customers, but instead a board member from the customers board. If they don’t have a board, find some senior person who advises them who is similarly disconnected from reality.

Board members tend to speak board-ese.

-6- Corporate Minutes

Did you record that jaunt to the strip club after the board meeting in Scottsdale Arizona?!

Did you record what was said on the tahoe ski slopes?!

Well corporate minutes are to be taken seriously so discuss what your goal corporate minutes should be looking like BEFORE your ivory tower meeting.

-7- Meeting With Board Members…

Are technically different from board meetings.

With the onus of corporate minutes being taken, no one wants to say or do anything remotely aggressive

A typical Ivory Tower board meeting is where everyone is stating the obvious and recapping business history. What is worse is personal war stories from by-gone eras.

Avoid this by…

-8- Finding a Pastie

A patsy is a fall-guy who takes the blame
A pastie is like a fall-guy who takes the blame it better because it looks good, covers up something awesome and is disposable

An example board member who is a pastie is me.

I come in.
I look good*
I get it done and you dispose of me when the agenda is accomplished

This week the Board of Wal-Mart is meeting.

I’m lobbying for it to meet at the employees lounge of the Scottsdale Arizona store off the 101 freeway. Wish me luck

If you liked this… default

Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983. His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School
*** BONUS ***

a party invite for you…


This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”. Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog


Continue reading...

How to Hack Into Y-Combinator Via the Front Door

Wed, Jun 1, 2011

0 Comments

Larry Chiang investigates and experiences entrepreneurship and pre-entrepreneurship. He covers the front-lines via Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. He has a JBA not an MBA. Its a Jedi in Business Administration. After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). If you read his scandalously awesome “How to Hack at AfterParty“, “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

How to Hack Into Y-Combinator Via the Front Door

By Larry Chiang

Y-combinator is a business incubator. It gets founders a decent dose of cash and access to more VCs.

Based in Mountain View, California, it was started by Paul Graham. Paul presented at TechCrunch Disrupt in NYC in a new and unique format. The audience was allowed to listen in on ‘office hours’. These founder interactions simulated the real office hours that Graham does with the incubator portfolio companies.

Its an incredible program that many of the people I mentor either have been in, will go to or would like to get in. Hack in by having great answers and prepare a ton.

Paul Graham focus on these questions
- What problems does your startup solve?
- Who would pay for this?
- Do you have beta (early) customers?

I recommend answering these questions via a YouTube video. Email me the link to your answers and I will post the best ones and give you feedback

Watch the TechCrunch video below and check out Jason Kincaid‘s post on this

If you liked this…
default
Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983.
His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

*** BONUS ***
a party invite for you…

This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”.
Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog .


Continue reading...

What They Do Teach You at Stanford Engineering About Entrepreneurship

Mon, May 23, 2011

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Larry Chiang helps engineers graduate with street-smarts. What they don’t teach in b-school they now do teach in engineering schools and via the Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. He holds a JBA (Jedi in Business Administration). After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). If you read his scandalously awesome “How to Hack at AfterParty“, “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

What They Do Teach You at Stanford Engineering About Entrepreneurship

By Larry Chiang

I notoriously wrote a book about a school that I did not attend.

Well now that I lecture, mentor, hack and host at Stanford engineering, I’ll reveal What They Do Teach You at the Engineering School

I argue that teaching cs majors to be CEOs is easier than teaching CEOs cs skills. Stanford ENGR 145 is a legendary experience where cs majors, engineers and those in the MS&E program GET STREET SMART. Here is how:

- 1 – Create a lemonade stand business like HotorNot or ICanHazCheezburger
-2- 5-10 ideas -> tangible, tactical, entrepreneurial execution

Stanford ENGR 145 class broke into teams that founded companies

-3- Pitching / feedback swap
-4- API mashup to minimize

-5- Minimum Viable Party
-6- copy paste ideas changing it 20-50%

Stanford ENGR 145 team presented at TechCrunch

-7- pitch to strangers
-8- Tactical ways to woo mentors
-9- How to crash conferences and have the host thank you.

If you liked this… default

Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983. His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”. Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog

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What They Don’t Teach You at NFL Rookie Camp

Sat, May 21, 2011

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Larry Chiang wrote a sequel to a book he did not author and speaks at schools that he could not get into. He edits the Bloomberg BusinessWeek channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (its the same title as his NY Times bestseller). If you read his scandalously awesome “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post

What They Don’t Teach You at NFL Rookie Camp

By Larry Chiang

NFL defensive schemes have massively changed over time. So has how the NFL prepares its athletes.

Athletes with million dollar contracts can have horrible credit. Here are some tips, techniques, strategies and ideas for you NFL millionaires on how to get your FICO credit score over the Devil’s handicap (FICO of 666):

-1- Lend your money. Don’t lend your name.

Co-signing a loan is a sure-fire way to get a charge-off.

A charge-off is a bad loan. In credit industry terms, it is a ’9′. You want to duck 9′s.

When you co-sign a loan, you are doing two things… lending money and lending your name. Lending money is up to you. Lending your name is a double-whammy so you should never co-sign on someone else’s loan.

I hear hundreds of stories of how athletes uncle’s mentored you in how to be a better line-backer when you were just 12 years old. Well, you should pay a portion of his payment but never ever co-sign their loan.

-2- Do Reimbursements as an Advance on Expenses

You have staff and those staff have expenses.

Have them submit expenses weekly or monthly. Offer to advance them on expenses. For example, if your advance schedule manager has about $5k of expenses per month, advance them $5.2k. This way if their expenses are 4.2k, they actually owe you money.

It gets your staff to never ask you for your credit card. Or it gives you a proactive countermeasure to when your staff does ask you for a credit card.

It gets your staff to never ask you to get a credit card in their own name. They take the $5.2k advance and park it in a debit card account or pre-paid VISA.

Your accountant then can go line-by line in approving expenses.

I had to buy my way into Capcom’s video game “Dead Rising” but it helps when I am man-charming alpha males

-3- Money Missed is Not Missed Money

MC Hammer told me this.

I know that everyone thinks he lost all his money, but he is very savvy and is doing very well now.

This quote is meant to emphasize delayed gratification.

TechCrunch August Capital - MC Hammer, Larry Chiang, Chamillionaire, Jeff Lange

TechCrunch August Capital – MC Hammer, Larry Chiang, Chamillionaire, Jeff Lange

-4- Tease

This is just a tease of tips. Email me from your PDA and I will give you more ideas. No, I won’t charge you. No I won’t ask you for comp tix. No I won’t ever tell anyone that I am mentoring you about your credit.

Remember Mr NFL superstar
1- I never blog about anyone other than myself and
2- I am big enough to star in a video game too

If you liked this… default

Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983. His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”. Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog

Continue reading...

What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School, They Now Do Teach in the Engineering School

Thu, May 19, 2011

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Larry Chiang investigates and experiences entrepreneurship and pre-entrepreneurship. He covers the front-lines via Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s channel “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. He has a JBA not an MBA. Its a Jedi in Business Administration. After Chiang’s Harvard Law keynote, Harvard Business wrote: “What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School“ (the same title as his NY Times bestseller). If you read his scandalously awesome “How to Hack at AfterParty“, “What a Supermodel Can Teach a Stanford MBA” and “How to Get Man-Charm”, you will like his latest post:

What They Don’t Teach You at Stanford Business School, They Now Do Teach in the Engineering School

By Larry Chiang

I constantly hear the complaints of whiney VCs and founders too: “I can’t find any engineers or developers”Well, I get tired of hearing this so I am solving this. With a partyProfessor Tom Kosnik, Professor Chuck Eesley and I have this theory that people do better when a mentor paves a way…

Yay, lets do a party and get this process going.

Lets get CS majors and VCs in a room

VCs are always hunting for CS talent.

B-school founders are just two developer founders short of rounding out their team.

Founders also bitch about not having enough engineering talent.

Well, me and Professor Kosnik solve problems and that is where E145 comes in.
We are taking an already legendary class and taking it to the next, next level during summer session.

Last year, I crashed 30 Stanford kids into major major tech conferences. Lets all execute my obnoxious article on GigaOm and over-the-top post in TechCrunch. It is required reading for engineers that expect to graduate street-smart**.

Step ONE is about “How to Charm a VC to Mentor Us

Remember, in this age of ‘Moore’s law’ and “everything is FASTER”…

…if you can not get your ROI for your $96 BEFORE you come… you should probably read my articles on “How to Work a Conference”. If you don’t get your money’s worth before the party starts, you should not be coming and maybe you should re-think being an entrepreneur.

and its free so ka-pow. There is your ROI

*** BONUS ***
a party invite for you…

If you liked this…

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Larry’s mentor Mark McCormack wrote this in 1983. His own book came out 09-09-09. It is called ‘What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School

This post was drafted in an hour and needs your edits… email me if you see a spelling or grammatical error(s)… larry@larrychiang com

Larry Chiang started his first company UCMS in college. He mimicked his mentor, Mark McCormack, founder of IMG who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School”. Chiang is a keynote speaker and bestselling author and spoke at Congress and World Bank.

Text or call him during office hours 11:11am or 11:11pm PST +/-11 minutes at 650-283-8008. Due to the volume of calls, he may place you on hold like a Scottsdale Arizona customer service rep. If you email him, be sure to include your cell number in the subject line. If you want him to email you his new articles…, ask him in an email :-)

You can read more equally funny, but non-founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog

Continue reading...